Creative Life

Pretty Girl

on March 27, 2014 in Creative Life with no comments by

 

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I am a pretty girl.

I carry many burdens.

They are my ballast,

lest one day, I float to the sky.

 

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Am I the Face of the New American Middle Class?

on March 11, 2014 in Creative Life, Latest News with 3 comments by

Kford love70

 

This article was originally published on the first page of the Huffington Post in the blog section.  

I graduated from college during the recession of the ’80s. I had the same youthful high hopes that all college graduates have and I assumed I’d find a job. After all, I was a Phi Beta Kappa honors student with work experience. But the only jobs I could find were part-time, low-paying teaching positions. To make ends meet, I cleaned houses, the same job I’d had at 16. I owned almost no furniture. I ate very little. I was always sick but I couldn’t afford a doctor. I felt betrayed. I had studied so hard but there was no reward.

A few years later, I was lucky enough to get a job in Japan. I taught in a community college and wrote for a Japanese newspaper. My profession was well-respected and I was well-paid. My apartment, transportation and health care were all paid for. I saved money. I traveled. I had plenty of time to work on my novels. I never worried. Those years I spent in Japan were the only time in my adult life that I felt successful and securely part of the middle class.

I married and had a wonderful daughter. We lived in a nice apartment in Tokyo and we had a housekeeper who cleaned and cooked twice a week. My greatest joy was all the time I spent with my daughter and husband.

When my daughter was older, we moved to Maui so that she could attend a good private school and grow up happy and healthy. Not long after this, things began to go wrong. My husband discovered he had diabetes. He rapidly went blind and lost his business. He was hospitalized and that’s when we discovered he had cancer. He died a few months later. My daughter and I were on our own. Then the recession hit.

I had two priorities: survival and to give my daughter a good education. So I taught for a private school and worked in a hotel. But even though I worked hard enough to develop heart palpitations, I had trouble making the rent.

Meanwhile my daughter flourished. She was an honors student and I vowed to keep her in the school she loved. I knew that cleaning houses was a good way to survive on Maui, but at first I was too proud to work the same job I’d had in high school. Finally I swallowed my pride and started cleaning houses.

The work was hard. The heat and tropical climate on Maui are wonderful if you are sitting in a deck chair enjoying the view. But they are not so great if you are vacuuming and scrubbing, up to your elbows in hot water. After work, I made dinner for my daughter, often falling asleep at the kitchen table. At night, I lay down saying, “Oh God, please don’t let me die in my sleep.” When I woke up in the morning, I always breathed a sigh of relief. I know three women my age who have suffered fatal heart attacks.

When I first moved to Maui, I was shocked to meet people who couldn’t afford to leave the island. A few hundred dollars for a plane ticket was impossible for them. But now I was one of them.

Piece by piece, I sold off all of the jewelry my husband had given me, plus my family heirlooms, to pay for my daughter’s education. I sold a beautiful strand of pearls to a debutante from Chicago. On the day we agreed to exchange them, I put the pearls around my daughter’s neck and showed them to her in the mirror. I explained how valuable they were.

“As beautiful as these pearls are, you and your wonderful mind are much more beautiful and precious to me. I guess from now on, we’ll call these ‘our pearls of wisdom’ because they are going towards your education,” I told her.

She laughed and hugged me.

Despite everything we never had enough money. I begged and then pleaded for financial assistance to keep my daughter in school. I held garage sales. The families I cleaned for rummaged through their closets and generously donated items. I sold cookies and brownies. I cried on the day I learned how to apply for aid because work as slow. Somehow I managed to work on my novels a few minutes a day, my only solace.

I quickly learned that most of the things we consider middle class essentials are really luxuries. The list is endless, from television and a land line to hair products and household products to vitamins, most medicines, fast food, drinks other than water and all non-essential groceries.

We eat mostly fish and rice with vegetables and fruit from the farmer’s market. I splurge on tea and coffee. Sometimes I cut my food intake in half so there is more for my daughter. I’ve been wearing the same clothes for 10 years. When they get holes in them, I mend them. I gave all of my cute Tokyo clothes to my daughter. When I can afford to buy clothes, it’s usually at the thrift shop and almost always for my daughter.

I began to feel I had slipped so low that I was no longer respected. I lost self confidence. I stopped talking about my writing. Soon nobody knew that I was a writer or that I’d ever gone to college. Nobody knew me. I became invisible.

But hard work and sacrifice does have some rewards. My daughter graduated and she was awarded a full scholarship to a top private university on the West Coast. People still ask me, how did you manage to raise such a wonderful girl and get her through private school all by yourself? I never know what to say because it still seems like a miracle to me. So many times I thought I would fail, but somehow we made it through.

Before my daughter left for college, I told her that true success is not just about money. True success is measured by how happy you are. Always strive for happiness, I told her.

I’m still cleaning houses and eating very little to save money for when my daughter comes home on vacation. I worry that I won’t have enough money to feed her. I try not to think about my own future. Retirement is something other people do. I assume I’ll work until I die.

Each day as I go from one cleaning job to the next, I stop to talk to the working homeless who live on the beach and who own nothing more than some clothes and a cell phone. The next minute, I’m talking to someone who owns several, multimillion dollar beach-front homes and a private jet. I walk a treacherous tight rope between these two worlds, always afraid of falling. Sometimes I wonder, “Am I the face of the new American middle class?” I hope not. I really hope not.

New Reviews for The Wife of John the Baptist

on January 29, 2014 in Creative Life, Latest News with no comments by
“This is such a beautiful book and sure to fire up controversy. Did John the Baptist have a wife? Was he really such a charming, charismatic and dare I say, sexy man? This novel is so human that you can almost hear the characters breathing. Filled with passion, amazing historical detail and triumph in the face of tragedy, the beauty of this novel will stay with you for a long time to come. A wonderful weekend read.”
“This is one of the most interesting historical fiction novels I have ever read. It provides incredible insight into the life and times of John the Baptist. I never thought about the possibility of John the Baptist having a wife before but this book makes it very believable. The character of John’s wife is beautifully drawn. Not only does she immediately draw the reader into the story, she paints a picture of a marriage that is filled with love, yet very realistic. I read this book in one sitting and enjoyed every minute.”
“I heard of this author from her first novel and was excited to read the second release. This is an awesome love story, page turner and we highly recommend. It is an easy read and not too long. We bought four copies total and gave out to friends.”
“Incredible love story, gripping and hard to put down.”
“Lovely, engaging story celebrates the role of women.”
 “This well-told story often moved me to tears, and allowed me to fall in love with John and his wife, Hessa.”
“The Wife of John the Baptist is a book I’d recommend to both my Christian, and secular friends. It’s a great story no matter what your beliefs.
Now I’m curious as to what else K. Ford might write about.”
The Wife of John the Baptist is available on Amazon.

The Wife of John the Baptist

on January 15, 2014 in Creative Life, Latest News with no comments by

 india_desert_sand

It took fourteen years of researching, writing and promoting but The Wife of John the Baptist is finally published and in my hands.   After spending so much time with these characters, I love them so much that they are like family.  From the curious, intuitive Hessa, the young Greek woman who falls in love, to the charismatic John, a man whose destiny would lead them both into the wilderness and into a future that neither one of them can control.

Now available on Amazon:   http://amzn.com/1493722468

Some early reviews:

“This would make a wonderful movie if any producers are listening.”

“Captivating story and gorgeous prose. An original story set in a unique time period. A very satisfying experience. Highly recommended. Stunning!”

“I had great expectations for this book by K Ford K, and it did not disappoint me. It has all the elements I love, leaving me with the desire to hear/read/feel more from this author. It transported me to an individual’s life in another time and culture, and I felt as if I were a fly on a wall, observing it all. I am intrigued by the thought of fate as being created unwittingly by those who believe they will outsmart it. I loved the story’s unexpected twists and turns, a surprise for me around every corner. However this story was dreamed into being, in reading it I am reminded of my enchantment with the writings of Joan Grant and Diana Gabaldon. When a story is portrayed so clearly, I am left hungry to watch more of the larger picture “movie”!

 

 

The Abandoned Whore House at the End of Town

on December 18, 2011 in Creative Life, Latest News, Writing the Wave with 2 comments by

Russenkaserne take a bathSometimes people ask me where my ideas come from. That’s kind of like asking where my dreams come from. Usually when I’m writing, my dreams just spill out all over the page. But once in awhile I can pinpoint exactly where an idea comes from. The other day I came across something like that. It’s something I lifted right out of my childhood.

Part of my childhood was spent in a Colorado mining town that had seen better days. Abandoned buildings were everywhere, left over from the gold and silver rush days. In the summer time, I walked to the swimming pool every day with my friends. As we walked, we sang pop songs girl-group style. We were always in search of an adventure such as taking turns almost drowning in the river (accidentally, of course) or trespassing into abandoned buildings where the floor boards could give way any second and send us to our death. If we were feeling really brave we might see who could walk the farthest into an abandoned mine before running back outside to safety. I was definitely not the winner at this game. Dark, creepy mines full of hidden shafts and rotting timbers terrified me.

To get to the swimming pool, we took back alleys where there were even more abandoned buildings than on the main streets. One building in particular had been locked up tight. Whoever left the building didn’t want anyone to go in it ever again. But the boards, nails and locks that had been put on the building long before I was born were no match for the dry rot that summer. It caused the entire front of the building to fall right off and into the dusty yard.

From then on the building was open like a dolls house and my friends and I were fascinated. On the first floor was a stage with wine red velvet curtains and painted backdrops. There were tables with chairs stacked on top of them as if they had just cleaned the floors and were ready to open again the next day. Upstairs there were twenty tiny rooms, each one with a small iron bed frame and room for little else.

Of course we climbed inside and danced on the stage. We went up the dangerously rickety staircase too but each of the twenty rooms was locked up tight.

We loved the stage so we played there often. Then one day an elderly neighbor walked by. “This was The Cribs. It was called that because of all the tiny rooms,” she said. “Lots of young women worked here in the old days. They sang and danced every night for their customers. You could hear the music all over town.”

“What happened to them?” I asked.

She just shook her head. “I don’t know. A few of them stayed and married. I don’t know about the rest.”

I had forgotten about the Cribs until I started writing about it. Suddenly the Cribs came back to life and I created a whole town around it called Valentine, Nevada. The town lives and breathes on the page, and so does this almost forgotten event in my childhood, The Cribs, the abandoned whore house at the end of town.

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